Disclaimer

The views and opinions posted in this blog by craigball are the views and opinion of Craig Ball and are not made on behalf of any other person or entity.  I do not speak for Warren Buffet or Lindsay Lohan, and they do not speak for me.  The Ball in your Court blog is not affiliated with the Ball in your Court column I contributed to Law Technology News magazine until February 2014, even though both address similar topics and both are written by the same person.  No, that doesn’t make much sense to me either; but, I want to be sure you understand that what I say here should not be imputed to the fine folks at American Lawyer Media, its heirs, assigns, owners, employees, officers or minions.  Especially not the minions.  Leave the poor minions alone!

I am a lawyer (licensed in Texas), but I’m not YOUR lawyer.  Nothing I say here is legal advice or counsel on which you should rely in the conduct of your own affairs.  I only consult with lawyers and courts, and I don’t do that by blogging.  I do not offer legal services to the general public.  So, please don’t ask me for legal advice on particular issues or matters.  I’m off duty here.

I am not responsible for comments posted on this site.  While I will endeavor to act responsibly to remove comments that are wildly inappropriate, needlessly offensive or spam, comments may appear before I know they’ve been posted or can read them.  So, if you have a problem with a comment, please let me know (e-mail: craig at ball dot net).  Thank you.

1 thought on “Disclaimer”

  1. David Lapresi said:

    Craig, as mentioned in your articles and blogs, I thought I would share this actual response and a very typical response and push back when asking for Natives.

    I would also like to discuss further the production of documents in true native format. While we would agree to produce in native format files such as Excel spreadsheets that are not useful when converted to Tiff, we have several concerns with producing all documents in true native format. First, when producing in Native, the integrity of the documents we produce is not secured and the documents can be easily altered. If we produce in native, how would you propose ensuring that documents later used in the litigation have not been altered? Second, it is our experience that documents produced in native are very difficult to keep track of as a practical matter because each page number is not separately identified. This becomes particularly difficult when documents are used for depositions, summary judgment motions, and trial exhibits.

    When producing in Tiff format we would provide metadata to identify the family grouping of email or any other family relationships to reproduce how documents were kept in the regular course of business. If there are particular metadata fields you are concerned about, please let us know and work together on providing the fields requested.

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